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Tilapia

Tilapia Continuing Research department
 
Serving the Educational and Hobby Aquaculturist
You can start from 25, 50, 100 or more Tilapia Fingerlings
 
Aquaculture Equipment for Classroom or Home
We provide fancy Aquarium for better viewing- 55 gallons with double action filter, LED ligths and bubble oxygen device
with interior fancy cabinet that can handle 55 gallons -made in USA

If you are Big Hotel owner or management in charge  and you need Koi not tilapia off course for your nice big fish pond can call 415-318-0247
 
If you are another fish farm and want to supply us quality and best price of  Tilapia and Koi Fingerlings call 415-318-0247

Info ref: sq3rrd/mt
 

Tilapia


The common name tilapia is based on the name of the cichlid genus Tilapia, which is itself a latinization of thiape, the Tswana word for "fish".Scottish zoologist Andrew Smith named the genus in 1840.

Tilapia is the fifth most important fish in fish farming, with production reaching 1,505,804 metric tons in 2000. Because of their large size, rapid growth, and palatability, tilapiine cichlids are the focus of major farming efforts, specifically various species of OreochromisSarotherodon, and Tilapia, collectively known colloquially as tilapia. Like other large fish, they are a good source of protein and popular among artisanal and commercial fisheries. Most such fisheries were originally found in Africa, but outdoor fish farms in tropical countries, such as Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Indonesia, are underway in freshwater lakes. In temperate zone localities, tilapiine farming operations require energy to warm the water to tropical temperatures. One method uses waste heat from factories and power stations.

China is the largest tilapia producer in the world, followed by Egypt.

Commercially grown tilapia are almost exclusively male. Cultivators use hormones, such as testosterone, to reverse the sex of newly spawned females. Because tilapia are prolific breeders, the presence of female tilapia results in rapidly increasing populations of small fish, rather than a stable population of harvest-size animals.

Tilapia fisheries originated in Africa. The accidental and deliberate introductions of tilapia into Asian freshwater lakes have inspired outdoor aquaculture projects in various countries with tropical climates, most notably Honduras, Papua New Guinea, the Phillipines and Indonesia. Tilapia farm projects in these countries have the highest potential to be "green" or environmentally friendly. In temperate zone localities, tilapia farmers typically need a costly energy source to maintain a tropical temperature range in their tanks. One relatively sustainable solution involves warming the tank water using waste heat from factories and power stations.

Tilapiines are among the easiest and most profitable fish to farm due to their omnivorous diet, mode of reproduction (the fry do not pass through a planktonic phase), tolerance of high stocking density, and rapid growth. In some regions the fish can be raised in rice fields at planting time and grow to edible size (12–15 cm, 5–6 inches) when the rice is ready for harvest. Unlike salmon, which rely on high-protein feeds based on fish or meat, commercially important tilapiine species eat a vegetable or cereal-based diet.

Tilapia raised in inland tanks or channels are considered safe for the environment, since their waste and disease is contained and not spread to the wild. However, tilapiines have acquired notoriety as being among the most serious invasive species in many subtropical and tropical parts of the world. For example Oreochromis aureusO. mossambicusSarotherodon melanotheron melanotheronTilapia mariae, and T. zilli have all become established in the southern United States, particularly in Florida and Texas.

Commercially grown tilapia are almost exclusively male. Being prolific breeders, female tilapia in the ponds or tanks will result in large populations of small fish. Whole tilapia can be processed into skinless, boneless (PBO) fillets: the yield is from 30% to 37%, depending on fillet size and final trim.

Research info:

 "In the United States, tilapia has shown the biggest gains in popularity among seafood, and this trend is expected to continue as consumption is projected to increase from 1.5 million tons in 2003 to 2.5 million tons by 2010," write the Wake Forest researchers in an article published this month in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Farm-raised tilapia, one of the most highly consumed fish in America, has very low levels of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids and, perhaps worse, very high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. (Credit: iStockphoto/Olga Lyubkina)

Note:Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help to Reduce the Physical Harm Caused by Smoking (Apr. 20, 2012) — Omega-3 fatty acids may help to reduce the physical harm caused by smoking.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Reduce Risk Of Advanced Prostate Cancer (Mar. 25, 2009) — Omega-3 fatty acids appear protective against advanced prostate cancer, and this effect may be modified by a genetic variant in the COX-2 gene, according to a report in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Blue Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Blue Tilapia Small Fingerlings
Blue Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Blue Tilapia Fry
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Blue Tilapia Fry
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Blue Tilapia Large Fingerlings
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Blue Tilapia Large Fingerlings
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Mozambique Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Mozambique Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Hatchery Choice Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Hatchery Choice Tilapia Small Fingerlings
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Sinking Fry Powder
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